Experimenting With Eggs

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Lately, we have been learning all about seeds.  We are switching now to exploring how different animals grow.  With Easter coming, we decided to start with eggs.  I began by reading Guess What is Growing Inside This Egg by Mia Posada.

This is a perfect book for learning about eggs!  The book alternates between a picture of an egg with a few clues as to what animal grows inside the egg....

This is a perfect book for learning about eggs! The book alternates between a picture of an egg with a few clues as to what animal grows inside the egg….

On the next page, there is a picture of the animal with a lot of information on the baby animal.  It was really interesting.  We talked about the different animals and were the eggs are laid and the size of the eggs.  At the end of the book, there is a page with the actual size of each egg.  We found it interesting that the alligator egg was larger than the penguin egg.

On the next page, there is a picture of the animal with a lot of information on the baby animal. It was really interesting. We talked about the different animals, where the eggs are laid, and the size of the eggs. At the end of the book, there is a page with the actual size of each egg. We found it interesting that the alligator egg was larger than the penguin egg.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA A LOT of preparation went into this week.  I boiled seven eggs.  I soaked four raw eggs and three hard boiled eggs in vinegar for over twenty four hours.  Over night the vinegar dissolved the shell and left the strong membrane in tact.  I ran one of the soaked eggs under water and rubbed the dissolved shell off of the egg.  I then soaked the washed off egg in water for twenty four hours. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Here are all of the materials that I had on hand the day of class:

  • two glasses, half-filled with water
  • four hard boiled eggs
  • disposable pie tin
  • two toilet paper rolls
  • three vinegar soaked, non-hard boiled eggs
  • three hard-boiled eggs, soaked in vinegar- two white eggs, and one brown (this didn’t turn out to be necessary/very cool)
  • egg that was soaked in vinegar, then in water
  • bags for quick clean up

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA First, we investigated the vinegar soaked, non-hard boiled eggs.  We held them up to the light to see in them and we felt and rolled them around.  The kids loved touching them.  They were squishy, but fragile. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Next, we explored the hard-boiled, soaked eggs.  They dropped them and played with them, but they were not as interesting as the non-hard boiled eggs.  We ended up having a child squeeze it until it popped open. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Next was the non-hard boiled, vinegar, then water soaked egg.  The egg on the left was the non-hard boiled egg that was just soaked in vinegar.  The egg on the right was soaked in vinegar, than water for another twenty-four hours.  The membrane allows water to pass through, creating a larger, tighter egg.  We took a pin to it to see what happens.  I didn’t get a picture, but as soon as I pierced the egg, I got sprayed by water!  If I did this all over again, I would have more of these types of eggs available because it happens so fast, that I would like to show it over and over again.

Next is when things got a little crazy!

Next is when things got a little crazy!

I got the idea here.  THIS WAS A BLAST!!!  All you have to do is put a glass with water, under a disposable pie tin, under a toilet paper roll, under an egg.  I’m sure with children a bit older, you could use a non-hard boiled egg.  However, do to the coordination issues and the fact we had to do this inside (it was raining), we used hard-boiled eggs.  All the child needs to do is hit the side of the pie tin and the egg falls into the glass!  The egg rests on top of the toilet paper roll (not moving).  When the child knocks the pie tin, the toilet paper roll gets knocked out of the way also.  Due to force of gravity, the egg falls down into the glass and the water ensures that the egg doesn’t crack.  It didn’t crack when it landed in the water.  It was so much fun and each child was able to succeed!  After every child had a turn doing one glass, we put two glass, toilet paper rolls, and eggs and it worked!  Next time, I want to try four FOR SURE! Here is a video on how and why this works (from Steve Spangler’s website):

This was a really fun week! Enjoy! ~Miss Jenny

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Experimenting With Eggs

  1. I love that you used The Beatles glass! 😉 AND “Sick Science” makes some great videos – my kids love those and Steve Spangler. 😀

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s